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GSWPA Brand & Marketing Resources for Volunteers

It is the goal of Girl Scouts Western Pennsylvania to communicate the brand promise of Girl Scouts. Girl Scouts gives every girl access to life-changing experiences that inspire her to do something big. Thank you for partnering with us to represent the amazing things that our girls are doing to change the world.

Below are some tools, resources, and information to help you share the Girl Scout brand in our communities.

Submit a design for brand approval

Recruitment Items for Volunteers

We have materials to ensure all girls have the chance to become courageous, confident young women. When you use these items to promote recruitment, programs, events, and activities in your community, you’re improving your community and helping girls thrive.

Each year, the council develops a consistent girl and adult volunteer recruitment campaign, including flyers, postcards, and poster templates and messaging. Volunteers can view up-to-date and available items, such as bookmarks, stickers, tattoos, join/recruitment flyers, event flyers, etc. by joining the Girl Scout Recruitment and Champion Rally on Rallyhood. To request items for your future recruitment or community events, fill out the Recruitment Supply Request online form

Service unit and troop volunteers are welcome to create their own flyers using the templates provided above or following the guidelines outlined below regarding logos, branded elements, fonts, colors, etc.

Be sure to share your flyer with your GSWPA recruitment specialist so we can include your sign-up/recruitment event details to our Girl Scout Information Event Map.

Please note: GSWPA is not able to print volunteer-designed flyers.

Using the Girl Scout Brand

Girl Scouts is a beloved, iconic brand. Few brands are strong enough to be identified simply by a color or a shape, but we have both the unique shade of "Girl Scout green" and the singular Girl Scout Trefoil symbol working for us. These much-admired brand elements ensure that any of our branded items can be readily recognized as belonging to Girl Scouts. With everything we create, we aim to stay true to our brand and the values it represents—leadership, sisterhood, and inclusion.

All of us who communicate about Girl Scouts play a role in protecting the brand identity and in using it to spread the word about Girl Scouting! Here are some guidelines to use in communicating about Girl Scouts:

When do I need to use a licensed vendor for merchandise (t-shirts, patches, etc.)?

A GSUSA Regional Licensed Vendor must be used when merchandise contains the Girl Scout logo, the Girl Scout profiles, the Girl Scout Trefoil, or the words “Girl Scouts” (including “GS”), AND:

  • is being sold (if an item is being sold, you will also need to submit a Money Earning Activity Request Form). OR
  • is being given away at fee-based events or activities, including day camp

In this case, art must be approved by GSUSA. This approval happens through the GSUSA regional licensed vendor.

Find a current list of GSUSA licensed vendors HERE. Please email brand@gswpa.org with your concept or idea and for help connecting with a licensed vendor.

When can I use a non-licensed vendor for merchandise (t-shirts, patches, etc.)?

Non-licensed vendors may be used when merchandise does not contain the Girl Scout profiles, the Girl Scout Trefoil, or the words “Girl Scouts” (including “GS”)

OR

Contains the Girl Scout profiles, the Girl Scout Trefoil, or the words “Girl Scouts” (including “GS”), AND:

  • is not being sold or being provided as part of a fee-based event or activity, including day camp;
  • is being used for internal needs, such as a gift, award, or recognition; or
  • is being created for troop/group/service units, purchased with group funds, and given to members of group at no cost

GSWPA’s marketing and communications team is responsible for providing one-time-only approval for these products and ensuring that product graphic guidelines are followed, including:

  1. choosing safe and appropriate products, designs, and themes
  2. adhering to branding specifications

To submit a design for GSWPA brand approval, please fill out the GSWPA Branding Request form. GSWPA can also provide the specific logo files needed by vendors.

How do I use the council logo/Girl Scout logo?
gswpa-logo2
GS_ART_trefoil
gswpa-logo1
GS_ART_profiles
  • The logo should appear on every flyer, letter, or product that communicates about Girl Scouts.
  • It must appear in the upper or lower left-hand corner of a document.
  • Margin and/or white space clearance area around the service mark is determined by the height of the “g” in the service mark itself.
  • Do not stretch or modify logos or servicemarks in any way.
gswpa-logo-envelope
  • If on white space, the logo must be black lettering with green profiles. If the logo/servicemark will be on a solid background, it may be used in all white or all green. The green must always be PMS 355 or CMYK 94-0-100-0. A solid black logo/servicemark may be used in black and white print materials.
  • PLEASE NOTE:  While the profiles (or "heads") trefoil can now be used by itself, it should only be used to represent the BUSINESS of Girl Scouting, while the solid trefoil should be used to represent the FUN of Girl Scouting.  That said, 9 times out of 10, you will use the SOLID trefoil instead of the profiles for items such as t-shirts, flyers, etc. 
Which font should I use?
  • Always use Arial as the font on all Girl Scout communications/flyers/products.
  • The Arial font includes Arial Rounded MT Bold, Arial Black, Arial Narrow, and Arial Unic.
What about colors?

Primary Colors

The Girl Scout identity uses three core colors, green (PMS 355 or r0, g174, b88), black, and white.

When taking an item to a professional printer, specify Girl Scout Green as PMS 355 to make sure they use the proper ink color. For certain types of print and for web design, CMYK, RGB and HEX information is provided as well for color matching:

GScolors-primary

When creating materials for girls and parents, use the core colors with trefoils and/or illustrations to add fun, playful energy to a design.

For audiences like potential partners, alumnae, and donors, a restricted color palette helps establish a more serious, adult tone. Use photography to add pops of color to the mix.

Secondary Colors

While Girl Scout green remains a primary element of our brand, sometimes we need additional colors to bring hierarchy, contrast, and vibrancy to our designs. These eight secondary colors appeal to girls inside and outside our Movement.

The Girl Scout trefoil and profiles should always be Girl Scout green, but the following colors may be used in materials for important callouts, charts, graphs, or other infographic needs.

GScolors-secondary

Grade Level Colors: If creating internal materials for a specific grade level, corresponding grade level colors can be used.

What is the correct way to talk/write about Girl Scouts?
  • Always use “Girl Scouts”—never “Scouts.”
  • Begin each level of Girl Scouts with “Girl Scout”-i.e., Girl Scout Daisy, Girl Scout Brownie, etc.
  • Girl Scouts as an organization, is always singular, i.e., “Girl Scouts is the leading expert on girls’ healthy development.”
  • In talking about Girl Scout members, you can use a plural, i.e., “Girl Scouts in Allegheny County are selling cookies….” 
  • When mentioning our name in print, use either “Girl Scouts” or “Girl Scouts Western Pennsylvania.” Please note: there is no “of” in our council name. All references in text should be capitalized as shown.
How should I use graphics and photos?

Photos

Choosing photos to use for your piece is extremely important. Remember to focus on moments that matter. We want the world to see and feel for themselves all the amazing things our girls are doing and showcase the Girl Scout Leadership Experience.

Be sure that photos are crisp and not blurry. And be sure that all girls in a photo have photo releases before using the photo.

If you are planning to publish photos or videos of volunteers, Girl Scouts, or members of the public in a public online forum, you must obtain consent from the photo/video participants through a photo release. A signed Photo Release for Minors signed by the parents/guardians and a Photo Release for Adults is required. This release only provides permission for use directly related to Girl Scouts and should never be used to promote a business or political campaign. The troop leader should keep this document on file at all times.

What are guidelines related to social media and/or troop websites?

Girl Scout troops whose girls meet age criteria (13 years or older) and have parental permission may set up a group Facebook page or website. This site must be approved by the council, yes, but it can be a fantastic way for girls to share information, market Girl Scout products, and talk about their Take Action projects. Before you and the girls design a social media page or website, remember that the web is an open forum for anyone, including potential predators. Documented instances of cyber-stalkers make it imperative that any information that could jeopardize the safety and security of girls and adults is not disclosed online. Please adhere to these guidelines to ensure the girls’ safety: 

  • Use girls’ first names only. 
  • Never post girls’ addresses, phone numbers, or email addresses. 
  • Never, ever, ever post addresses of group meeting places or dates and times of meetings, events, or trips. (An adult volunteer who wishes to communicate upcoming events with families of girls should use email instead of posting details on a website, unless that site is password protected or is a closed/secret Facebook group.)
  • Always have a parent’s or guardian’s signature on a photo release form before using pictures of girls on a website or public social page.
  • Make yours a site that does not allow outsiders to post messages to the site, or make sure all postings (such as message boards or guest books) have adult oversight and are screened prior to posting live. 
  • Don’t violate copyright law by using designs, text from magazines or books, poetry, music, lyrics, videos, graphics, or trademarked symbols without specific permission from the copyright or trademark holder (and, generally, this permission is pretty tough to get!).
  • Girl Scout trademarks (such as the trefoil shape, Girl Scout pins, and badges and patches) can be used only in accordance with guidelines stated above. (The Girl Scout trefoil, for example, may not be animated or used as wallpaper for a website.) 
  • Don’t forget to let us know you created a page or website! We love to know about all the great things you’re doing in Girl Scouts!